ALUMINUM

Aluminum Car Rims
Aluminum car or pickup rims that have the tires, valve stems, and wheel weights removed.  Note:  Rims that are aluminum with chrome plating are purchased as cast aluminum, and aluminum semi-truck rims are purchased as aluminum extrusion.
Aluminum Extrusion
This is aluminum that has been passed or 'extruded' through a die (much like spaghetti noodles are made by squeezing dough through a press).  This aluminum must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Great examples of extrusion are: aluminum window and door framing, ladders, semi truck rims, and certain types of running boards.
Aluminum Siding
This is siding, flashing, fascia, or gutters that are made of aluminum.  Factory painted items are okay, however, otherwise it must be clean--meaning any and all insulation or foam backing must be removed and it must be free of steel nails/screws as well as tar/caulk.
Aluminum Sheeting
This is aluminum that is in sheet form, or aluminum products that have been made by forming or bending a sheet of aluminum.  This aluminum must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar/caulk, other types of metals, etc.  Great examples of sheeting are:  aluminum roofing panels, lightweight pots and pans, and lawn chair framing.
Mixed Cast Aluminum
Aluminum products that have been made or 'casted' by pouring melted aluminum in a mold, are considered cast aluminum.  Cast aluminum will break under pressure, as opposed to bending like many other types of aluminum.  This aluminum must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.   Great examples of cast aluminum are:  barbecue grill lids/tops, heavy aluminum pots/pans, and aluminum engine/car parts.
Light Aluminum Remelt
This is aluminum that is slightly dirty--meaning that it contains small amounts of plastic, steel, foam, or other components that are not aluminum.  To be considered light remelt, the percentage of steel/contaminants to aluminum would be approximately 5% steel (or less) to 95% aluminum.  Examples of light aluminum remelt are:  aluminum siding that contains steel nails/screws, paper backing, or tar/caulk, storm doors that have steel screws or rivets, ladders with plastic steps or steel rivets, antennae with plastic pieces and steel rivets, and lightweight pots and pans with the plastic handles still attached.   
Heavy Aluminum Remelt
This is the dirtiest form of aluminum--meaning that it contains plastic, steel, foam, or other components that are not aluminum.  To be considered heavy remelt, the percentage of steel/contaminants to aluminum would be approximately 30% steel to 70% aluminum--the aluminum must outweigh the steel or contaminants.  Examples of heavy aluminum remelt are:  engines with aluminum blocks and heads, lawnmower engines, heavy aluminum pots and pans with the handles still attached, various aluminum engine parts that still contain steel, aluminum siding that contains foam backing, and lawn chairs with intact webbing. 
Foil/Screens/Cans
Aluminum foil, screening material, and cans fall in this category.  All material must be free of any contaminants, including food.  Cans must be rinsed and any paper labels must be removed.  Examples are:  pop can tabs, cat food cans, and pie tins.
Aluminum Shavings
Aluminum shavings are small, thin, pieces of aluminum that are the byproduct of a machining process (much like pencil shavings are created when a pencil is sharpened).  All aluminum shavings must be clean, meaning they should contain no steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc. and they should be free from moisture.
COPPER​
#1 Copper
#1 copper can be thought of in two ways:  A.  Copper wiring where each individual strand is 14 gauge or larger (the size of a No.2 pencil lead or larger) -OR-  B.  Brand new, bright and shiny copper tubing (ie. no paint, solder, or corrosion).   All #1 copper must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Copper wiring that is enamel-coated is NOT considered #1 copper.
#2 Copper
To be considered #2 copper, the material must be:  A.  Copper wiring where each individual strand is smaller than 14 gauge (smaller than the size of a No.2 pencil lead) -OR- B. Used/corroded copper tubing that may contain paint, corrosion, and/or solder.  Enamel-coated wiring also falls in this category.  All #2 copper must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.
#3 Copper
This is copper that is in sheet form, or objects that have been fashioned by forming or bending a sheet of copper.  This type of copper may contain paint, corrosion, enamel, and/or solder, however otherwise it must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Examples of #3 copper are:  copper gutters, copper pots/pans, copper roofing flashing, copper toilet floats, and old-fashioned copper wash tubs.
Insulated Copper Wire
Copper wiring that has the standard plastic, foam, or rubber insulating coating is considered insulated copper wire.  Standard household plug-ends can remain attached, however, any plastic AC adaptor boxes, computer plug ends with pins and/or thumb screws, or large industrial size plug-ends must be removed before they will be accepted as insulated copper wire.  Great examples of insulated copper wire are:  extension cords, romex, or appliance power cords.
Christmas Lights/Phone Cord/Computer & Ethernet Cable
Because of the amount of plastic and insulation vs. the amount of recoverable copper, Christmas Lights, Phone Cords, and Computer Cables are purchased separately from insulated copper wire.  Any large plastic AC adaptors or computer plug ends with pins and/or thumb screws must be cut off the wire and discarded before we will accept the wires.  Christmas lights with the larger sized bulbs (think the old-fashioned style bulbs), will need to have the bulbs removed.  However, if you have the newer-style Christmas lights with the miniature bulbs, we can accept them as-is-- no need to remove the bulbs.
BRASS/STAINLESS
Red Brass
Red brass contains a higher copper content than other forms of brass, giving it a slightly reddish or pink hue.  In fact, red brass is often confused with copper because of its reddish color.  Red brass must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Usually we see red brass in the form of industrial grade plumbing/pipe fittings and mechanical components.
Yellow Brass
Yellow brass is the type of brass that most people have in mind when they think about brass.  Yellow brass is yellow in color, and typically brighter and shinier than other forms of brass.  Yellow brass must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Brass plumbing fittings and tubing that are chrome-plated can also be purchased as yellow brass.  Examples of yellow brass are: brass bolts/screws, keys, household faucets & spigots, brass fittings/tubing, and brass figurines and knick-knacks.  Note: bullets will be purchased as yellow brass, but must have any steel removed and must be kept separate from any other brass items.
Stainless Steel (Non-Magnetic)
Stainless steel is a type of iron that has been alloyed with nickel, manganese, carbon, and nitrogen to give it superior strength and corrosion resistance.  While it is made of iron, the items it is alloyed with are what give it its non-magnetic properties.  Stainless steel must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Some stainless steel examples are:  sinks, commercial/industrial kitchen tops, pots and pans, stainless screws/bolts, and milk tanks.  (Note: Magnetic stainless steel will be purchased as tin.)
RADIATORS
Radiators (Brass/Copper)
Radiators (Brass/Copper) are those constructed with copper fins and brass tubing OR brass fins and copper tubing.  These are usually found in older automobiles (pre 1980), tractors, and various types of equipment.  Any steel or cast iron framing must be removed from these radiators in order to receive Radiators (Brass/Copper) price.  Leaving steel or cast iron framing may result in the radiator being purchased as tin.
Aluminum Radiators
Aluminum radiators are just that--radiators constructed with aluminum fins and tubing.  These are found in newer vehicles, tractors, and equipment, and they often times have plastic tanks on their ends.  In order to be purchased as aluminum radiators, they must be clean, or free of any steel and have their plastic tanks removed.  Aluminum radiators that still have the plastic tanks attached will be purchased as light aluminum remelt.
Copper/Aluminum Radiators
Radiators that consist of copper tubing and aluminum fins are considered copper/aluminum radiators.  These radiators must be clean, or free of any and all steel, plastic, foam, wood, glass, tar, other types of metals, etc.  Usually these radiators are found in air conditioners as well as the baseboards in hot water/radiant heating systems.  NOTE: A-frame style radiators found in air conditioners are not considered copper/aluminum radiators unless they are 100% clean.
Heater Cores
Heater cores are smaller, radiator-like devices used to heat the cabin/interior of a vehicle.  In order to be purchased under this category, heater cores must be constructed of either all copper or of copper and brass.  Any heater cores that have aluminum tubing and aluminum fins are purchased as aluminum radiators.

NON-FERROUS INFORMATION

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D&W Salvage, Inc.

1303 Minnick Rd.

Bad Axe, MI 48413

Main: (989) 269-6829

Fax:  (989) 269-8985

Email:  dwsalvage@dwsalvage.biz

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